CF Toronto Eaton Centre

Located in downtown Toronto, the CF Toronto Eaton Centre is one of North America's most visited shopping malls. More than 2.1 million sq feet of retail space serves tens of millions of shoppers each year at this four-level complex, which receives reliable rapid transit service from the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC).

Background and History

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The CF Toronto Eaton Centre opened in the late 1970s to accommodate the retail boom of the city. This complex was named after a major Canadian department store that eventually went bankrupt in the late 1990s. As one of the largest financial institutions in the nation, Toronto-Dominion Bank funded a large portion of the mall's construction. Cadillac Fairview is another prominent corporation that has been involved in the management of the property. Several skyscrapers were built directly above the mall as part of expansion of the city's retail district and financial sector. Opened in 1992, 250 Yonge Street is a skyscraper that stands 35 floors above the streets. The 36-floor Cadillac Fairview Tower is another architectural landmark at the complex. The opening of Yonge-Dundas Square in 2002 marked another important point in the mall's history. Surrounded by huge billboards, this vibrant urban square often hosts concerts and other exciting outdoor shows just steps away from the mall's entrance. Click to book your Toronto City Hop-On Hop-Off Bus Tour.

Retail and Food

Featuring a beautiful fountain, the Centre Court is the main gallery section on the first level of the CF Toronto Eaton Centre. Some retailers that are located on this floor include Eddie Bauer, The Gap, SoftMoc and American Eagle Outfitters. Hudson's Bay and Saks Fifth Avenue are department stores that also accessible from the first level. A station for guest services is centrally located on the second level, which includes dozens of notable shops, such as Guess, Abercrombie & Fitch and Armani Exchange. Canadian Tire and Mark's are some of the largest specialty stores on this floor. Nordstrom, H&M, Uniqlo and Best Buy are clustered together on the third level of the CF Toronto Eaton Centre. More than 20 other stores operate on this level, including Apple, Coach and Zara. The fourth floor is primarily occupied by Indigo Books, and there are some elevators that lead to the Galleria offices above. The Urban Eatery is the main food court. From Asian and Mexican to American and Italian dishes, this hub offers more than 20 delicious dining options. Several casual and upscale restaurants are also spread throughout the mall, such as Duke of Richmond, Bannock and Hendriks. Specializing in sporting goods, Sport Chek is the only store that operates at the Urban Eatery.

Visiting CF Toronto Eaton Centre

The TTC Yonge-University Line makes two stops near the CF Toronto Eaton Centre. You could get off at the Dundas Station and access the northern section of the shopping mall. Queen Station is situated near the southern section of this major retail hub. The 301, 501 and 502 streetcars also run just past the mall's southern perimeter. Shoppers arriving by car should take advantage of the Bay & Dundas or Yonge/Shuter parkades. Both parking garages charge hourly and daily fees, but bicycle racks are available for free. Lyft riders should use a designated dropoff/pickup zone near the Aritzia store. Additionally, the Toronto PATH tunnels and walkways link this shopping mall with many other points in neighboring districts. More than 20 parking garages and hundreds of businesses are connected to the city's extensive underground network that's designed for pedestrians. A contemporary skywalk connects the mall with Hudson's Bay.

Location: 220 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5B 2H1

Click here to visit CF Toronto Eaton Centre official website.

Published On: 2019-06-13
Updated On: 2019-06-13

Note: This information can change without notice. Confirm all details directly with the company in question.

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